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Check Oil Level 2007-2011 Dodge Nitro

Check Oil Level 2007-2011 Dodge Nitro



Video Description

Checking the oil in a Nitro is fairly easy and should be done once a month. Note that most Dodge have an oil pressure gauge next to the speedometer - this gauge does not tell you what your oil level is, however the video above will show you how check the oil level in your 2010 Dodge Nitro. Make sure your engine is cold when you check the oil in your Nitro. Otherwise the dipstick will read slightly low. In addition to checking the oil level, you also want to look at the condition of the oil when you have the dipstick out. If the oil in your Nitro is dirty or smells like gasoline, you probably need an oil change.

If you notice that the oil level in your Nitro is extremely low or empty, fill it up and check it again the next time you drive. If it is extremely low again, have your mechanic take a look before driving it much more.
 

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2007-2011 Dodge Nitro: Fix Oil Leaks

2007-2011 Dodge Nitro: Fix Oil Leaks


Video Description

This video shows you how to fix minor oil leaks in your 2010 Dodge Nitro and how to tell if the fluid leaking from your Nitro is oil, how to check your oil level and how to fix the oil leak. Low oil levels can wreck your engine, so it is important to be proactive about oil leaks, however small. Oil leaks in the 2010 Nitros with the 4.0 liter engine are often due to a bad seal in the drain plug - the metal washer in your drain plug can only be tightened a few times before it loses its ability to seal and should be replaced periodically to prevent leaking. Replacing the metal washer should only be done when you change the oil in your Nitro, fortunately the video above shows how to fix the minor leak in the interim.

Make sure that your engine is cold and that your Nitro is parked on a level surface when you check the oil level as both of these things can cause the oil level to read low. Check our What is Leaking? video to see what type of fluid is leaking from your Nitro if you need help figuring out what type of oil is leaking from your Nitro.


 

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Oil & Filter Change Dodge Nitro (2007-2011)

Oil & Filter Change Dodge Nitro (2007-2011)


Video Description

This video shows you how to change the oil and oil filter in your 2010 Dodge Nitro. When you change your own oil, you know that you are putting quality oil in your Nitro and that the filter is being changed too. Most importantly, you get a chance to look around under your Nitro for potential trouble spots. This video shows you the location of your oil drain plug, oil filter, oil fill cap and dipstick in addition to the steps needed to change the oil and filter in your Nitro. For most Dodges, you can wrap an old belt around the oil filter and unscrew it by hand. If you can't do this, see our parts page to find a Dodge Nitro oil filter wrench. If your Nitro is too low to the ground to access your drain plug and oil filter, be sure to use jack stands and safe jacking procedures before getting under your Nitro.

Most Dodges have the oil type printed on the oil cap - it will likely be 5W-20, 5W-30, 5W-40, 10W-30 or 10W-40. If it isn't printed on the oil cap, check your owners manual for the exact type before adding new oil. We recommend wearing safety glasses whenever you are working under your Nitro. You never know what could be dripping down from the engine, battery acid, engine coolant, brake fluid, etc. All of these fluids are extremely harmful to your eyes and skin so it is important to protect yourself.


 

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Service Light reset Dodge Nitro 2007


Published on Feb 4, 2016

Simple steps on how to reset the Service light / Service indicator on a Dodge Nitro 2007-
 

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Oil Change Dodge Nitro Jeep Liberty 3.7 liter


Published on Aug 7, 2016

1 of 2 videos showing you how to remove oil filter more easily.





Published on Aug 7, 2016

2 of 2 videos showing how to change the oil filter and reinstall one more easily.
 

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Oil Change Importance


Published on Jan 20, 2017

Oil is the lifeblood of your vehicle. It keeps your engine lubricated – and clean. A lot can happen if you neglect its oil…none of it good. Watch and learn how to keep your car healthy with frequent oil changes.
 

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How to reset oil change light


Published on Feb 23, 2017
 

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2007 dodge nitro oil change


May 9, 2018
This is how to do an oil change in a dodge nitro
 

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Five common myths about engine oil

Five common myths about engine oil

May 14, 2018



What does the W really stand for? Do you have to change your oil every 3,000 miles? Does synthetic oil cause leaks? With the help of Cenex, learn about what's real and what's not when it comes to engine oils.


Myth No. 1: The “W” in 10W-30 stands for “weight.”

The numbers in a multi-grade rating represent the oil’s viscosity, or thickness. The higher the number, the thicker the oil. The best oils are a happy medium; neither thick like sludge nor thin like water.

Because oil viscosity changes with temperature, the multi-grade rating gives you both the hot and cold viscosities. 10W represents the oil’s viscosity rating for winter use, according to a rating system developed by the Society of Auto Engineers. And that’s why the “W” in 10W-30 stands for “winter.”

Myth No. 2: You should change your oil every 3,000 miles.

Oil chemistry and engine technology have evolved tremendously since the days of the 3,000-mile oil change. The majority of vehicle manufacturers now recommend vehicle owners change their oil every 7,500 to 10,000 miles, based on a normal maintenance schedule. Why the change?

Synthetic oils, such as MAXTRON PCMO, are helping to stretch the time between oil changes. The improved oils provide superior anti-wear protection while maximizing fuel economy.

Also, oil life monitoring systems, which notify the driver when an oil change is needed, are becoming the standard in many new models. Instead of using the standby miles driven method, the technology monitors engine revolutions, operating temperatures and other factors to optimize the change interval selection.

Refer to your owner’s manual for your vehicle manufacturer’s oil change recommendation.

Myth No. 3: Synthetic engine oils can wear down seals in an engine and cause leaks.

This is an often-cited myth. In fact, if your seals and gaskets are in good condition, synthetic oil will not leak in your engine. Synthetic oil has not been shown to deteriorate engine seals or gaskets. But it might find an existing leak. The smaller molecules of synthetic oil are able to pass through very small cracks and crevices that the larger molecules of petroleum-based oil cannot. Eventually, those small cracks and crevices can lead to bigger problems — with or without synthetic oil.

Myth No. 4: My engine will benefit if I use supplemental additives.

Adding commercially available additives to your oil is unnecessary, as REPUTABLE MOTOR OILS will be already formulated with additives to ensure optimal engine performance.

Additional additives may dilute the effectiveness of the oil or even upset the oil chemistry. Refer to your owner’s manual for information about oil additives for your vehicle.

Myth No. 5: Once you use synthetic oil, you can’t switch back to conventional oil.

Switching between synthetic and conventional oils will not cause any damage to an engine. In fact, synthetic blends are a mixture of synthetic and conventional oil.

SOURCE
 

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Do I Need to Change Motor Oil for Summer?

Do I Need to Change Motor Oil for Summer?

Jun 15, 2018




There is a long-lasting belief among some car owners in places with four seasons that you may need to change the oil in your car as temperatures climb or fall.

Motor oil is the lifeblood of your car. It needs to be able to flow freely over all the moving parts of your engine. Traditionally, the temperature of the oil changed how easily it flowed through the engine. Called viscosity, this is the physical measurement for how “thick” a liquid is. Motor oil in low temperatures could turn into something more like molasses, which could prevent it from properly coating the engine in a cold start.

However, if you use the right motor oil, it keeps a higher viscosity at a lower temperature. But, as the heat rises, the oil becomes too thin. Motor oil uses the term weight to describe its viscosity, which is where the numbers you have seen on all oil containers comes from.

There is good news, however. Motor oil has come a long way. You no longer really need to change your motor oil every season, because it changes for you. Known as multi-viscosity motor oil, it does exactly what the name suggests. As temperatures fall, the weight of the oil changes to allow it to flow easily over the engine. Then, once summer comes back around, the oil thickens to protect the engine. This is how the motor oil gets its name; by displaying the two viscosities.

For most motor oils on the market today, their weight ratings come in the form of two numbers. The first, followed by a “W”, is the winter rating. The second, typically a much higher number, is the SAE standard rating for maximum temperature performance. So, if motor oil now changes based on the seasons, which one is the right one to buy? According to the SAE, motor oil, like this Valvoline oil rated at 10W30, is designed to stay fluid up to –30 C, while continue protecting the engine up to 100 C. It’s ideal for most temperate climates.




There are other factors for how hot motor oil gets; like speed. Track enthusiasts may find their engines producing a lot of heat, and the oil in their motor needs to be rated to handle that. Lucas Oil has formulated a synthetic oil with an SAE rating of 20W50. It should handle high heat and some cooler temperatures well.



Synthetic oil is actually still oil, just refined further than conventional motor oil. There are typically also more additives to boost performance. Mobil is a popular choice among OE vehicles, and their 0W40 full synthetic has excellent multi-viscosity ratings. Every engine is different, and most vehicles have been engineered to use a specific kind of motor oil. Refer to your user manual for the SAE rating which best fits your vehicle.



AutoGuide.com
 

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Do I Need to Change Motor Oil for Summer?

Do I Need to Change Motor Oil for Summer?

Jun 15, 2018




There is a long-lasting belief among some car owners in places with four seasons that you may need to change the oil in your car as temperatures climb or fall.

Motor oil is the lifeblood of your car. It needs to be able to flow freely over all the moving parts of your engine. Traditionally, the temperature of the oil changed how easily it flowed through the engine. Called viscosity, this is the physical measurement for how “thick” a liquid is. Motor oil in low temperatures could turn into something more like molasses, which could prevent it from properly coating the engine in a cold start.

However, if you use the right motor oil, it keeps a higher viscosity at a lower temperature. But, as the heat rises, the oil becomes too thin. Motor oil uses the term weight to describe its viscosity, which is where the numbers you have seen on all oil containers comes from.

There is good news, however. Motor oil has come a long way. You no longer really need to change your motor oil every season, because it changes for you. Known as multi-viscosity motor oil, it does exactly what the name suggests. As temperatures fall, the weight of the oil changes to allow it to flow easily over the engine. Then, once summer comes back around, the oil thickens to protect the engine. This is how the motor oil gets its name; by displaying the two viscosities.

For most motor oils on the market today, their weight ratings come in the form of two numbers. The first, followed by a “W”, is the winter rating. The second, typically a much higher number, is the SAE standard rating for maximum temperature performance. So, if motor oil now changes based on the seasons, which one is the right one to buy? According to the SAE, motor oil, like this Valvoline oil rated at 10W30, is designed to stay fluid up to –30 C, while continue protecting the engine up to 100 C. It’s ideal for most temperate climates.




There are other factors for how hot motor oil gets; like speed. Track enthusiasts may find their engines producing a lot of heat, and the oil in their motor needs to be rated to handle that. Lucas Oil has formulated a synthetic oil with an SAE rating of 20W50. It should handle high heat and some cooler temperatures well.



Synthetic oil is actually still oil, just refined further than conventional motor oil. There are typically also more additives to boost performance. Mobil is a popular choice among OE vehicles, and their 0W40 full synthetic has excellent multi-viscosity ratings. Every engine is different, and most vehicles have been engineered to use a specific kind of motor oil. Refer to your user manual for the SAE rating which best fits your vehicle.


AutoGuide.com
 

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Should You Use High-Mileage Oil in Your Car?




Stroll down the oil aisle of a typical auto-parts store and you’ll be confronted with a literal wall of lubricant.





Dozens of brands vie for your attention and dollars with countless different types and formulations. Some promise cleaner-running engines, others boast about improved fuel efficiency and still more claim to enhance performance.



Causing further confusion, there’s conventional and full-synthetic, plus blends of the two; there are oils made specifically for diesel engines and some for certain automotive brands. Others feature fancy-sounding metals including molybdenum, zinc and even titanium. And then there are lubricants that are supposedly tailor-made for older vehicles with lots of miles. All of this is confusing enough to make you head straight to your local dealership for service.


But let’s say you drive a well-worn vehicle, something with an odometer that’s been around the planet a few times. Is special high-mileage oil worth the extra price compared to a conventional lubricant?


Z. George Zhang, Ph.D. and director of Valvoline Technical International thinks so. He said there are “distinct differences” compared to regular oils.


“Most of the high mileage oil will have a seal conditioner,” he said. “Normally they will have more seal conditioners in the formula.” But that’s not the only difference between them and conventional lubricants.


CHEMICAL DIFFERENCES


“We actually talked to a lot of people with high-mileage [vehicles],” Zhang said. Their top complaint had to do with leaks. Drips and puddles on the pavement are embarrassing and unnecessary.



Having a car or truck that “marks its territory,” so to speak, is often the result of seal degradation. Over time the rubber components inside a powerplant can become brittle and shrink; small cracks can even form. All of this decay can lead to seepage and leaks.


“Most of the high-mileage oil will have a seal conditioner,” Zhang said. He also noted that Valvoline introduced its MaxLife product range around the year 1999 or 2000, so they’ve been on the market now for about a decade and a half.


With elastomers, a fancy name for the rubber materials seals are made from, Zhang said over time certain chemical components can leach out of them. Special conditioning compounds “tend to react with elastomers,” replacing what’s been lost over time and increasing their sealing abilities. Think of these chemicals as a salve. If your hands are dried out and the skin is cracked you can rejuvenate it with lotion, which restores its flexibility.


Top 12 Best Synthetic Oil Products You Can Buy


“We researched a lot of these chemical compounds that can be used to rejuvenate seals,” Zhang said. He also mentioned that seal conditioners help make seals more flexible and can cause them to expand slightly, another thing that helps stop leaks.


WHO SHOULD USE HIGH-MILEAGE OIL?


When is the time right to start running a high-mileage oil? The folks at Valvoline recommend you make the switch at 75,000 miles. Zhang said “we use 75,000 as a typical reminder,” though you can certainly run MaxLife or a similar product beyond that, or even before.


It’ s really good for high-mileage engines,” said Zhang, though the lubricant’s unique formulation includes more than just seal conditioners. Valvoline’s product, for instance, features extra anti-wear additives as well as additional dispersants and detergents to help break up any sludge and keep things clean.


Zhang said that when moving parts are out of tolerance, such as inside a high-mileage engine, there’s a greater chance for “metal-on-metal wear,” which is a very bad thing. He said “anti-wear materials form a sacrificial layer between metal surfaces” stopping harmful friction.


WHAT CAN HIGH-MILEAGE OIL DO?


In general terms, high-mileage oil probably costs a bit more than a comparable standard lubricant, but if your car has been around the block a few hundred thousand times, the benefits can be well worth the added expense.


For instance, the abovementioned seal conditioners can be surprisingly effective. According to Zhang “usually after two oil changes the leaking will be gone.” Additionally, he said, “some of the older vehicles tend to produce a white-bluish smoke,” which is a symptom of burning oil.

For instance, if an engine’s valve-guide seals have gone bad, the conditioners found in high-mileage lubricants can help reduce seepage past these parts, but that’s not all. Valvoline’s MaxLife product has a lower volatility rating, which means it’s less likely to burn in the first place. Zhang said this is “a fairly apparent thing [owners] can see after an oil change,” that is, less off-color smoke coming out of the tailpipe. Can you say instant gratification?​
 

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Should You Use High-Mileage Oil in Your Car?




Stroll down the oil aisle of a typical auto-parts store and you’ll be confronted with a literal wall of lubricant.





Dozens of brands vie for your attention and dollars with countless different types and formulations. Some promise cleaner-running engines, others boast about improved fuel efficiency and still more claim to enhance performance.



Causing further confusion, there’s conventional and full-synthetic, plus blends of the two; there are oils made specifically for diesel engines and some for certain automotive brands. Others feature fancy-sounding metals including molybdenum, zinc and even titanium. And then there are lubricants that are supposedly tailor-made for older vehicles with lots of miles. All of this is confusing enough to make you head straight to your local dealership for service.


But let’s say you drive a well-worn vehicle, something with an odometer that’s been around the planet a few times. Is special high-mileage oil worth the extra price compared to a conventional lubricant?


Z. George Zhang, Ph.D. and director of Valvoline Technical International thinks so. He said there are “distinct differences” compared to regular oils.


“Most of the high mileage oil will have a seal conditioner,” he said. “Normally they will have more seal conditioners in the formula.” But that’s not the only difference between them and conventional lubricants.


CHEMICAL DIFFERENCES


“We actually talked to a lot of people with high-mileage [vehicles],” Zhang said. Their top complaint had to do with leaks. Drips and puddles on the pavement are embarrassing and unnecessary.



Having a car or truck that “marks its territory,” so to speak, is often the result of seal degradation. Over time the rubber components inside a powerplant can become brittle and shrink; small cracks can even form. All of this decay can lead to seepage and leaks.


“Most of the high-mileage oil will have a seal conditioner,” Zhang said. He also noted that Valvoline introduced its MaxLife product range around the year 1999 or 2000, so they’ve been on the market now for about a decade and a half.


With elastomers, a fancy name for the rubber materials seals are made from, Zhang said over time certain chemical components can leach out of them. Special conditioning compounds “tend to react with elastomers,” replacing what’s been lost over time and increasing their sealing abilities. Think of these chemicals as a salve. If your hands are dried out and the skin is cracked you can rejuvenate it with lotion, which restores its flexibility.


Top 12 Best Synthetic Oil Products You Can Buy


“We researched a lot of these chemical compounds that can be used to rejuvenate seals,” Zhang said. He also mentioned that seal conditioners help make seals more flexible and can cause them to expand slightly, another thing that helps stop leaks.


WHO SHOULD USE HIGH-MILEAGE OIL?


When is the time right to start running a high-mileage oil? The folks at Valvoline recommend you make the switch at 75,000 miles. Zhang said “we use 75,000 as a typical reminder,” though you can certainly run MaxLife or a similar product beyond that, or even before.


It’ s really good for high-mileage engines,” said Zhang, though the lubricant’s unique formulation includes more than just seal conditioners. Valvoline’s product, for instance, features extra anti-wear additives as well as additional dispersants and detergents to help break up any sludge and keep things clean.


Zhang said that when moving parts are out of tolerance, such as inside a high-mileage engine, there’s a greater chance for “metal-on-metal wear,” which is a very bad thing. He said “anti-wear materials form a sacrificial layer between metal surfaces” stopping harmful friction.


WHAT CAN HIGH-MILEAGE OIL DO?


In general terms, high-mileage oil probably costs a bit more than a comparable standard lubricant, but if your car has been around the block a few hundred thousand times, the benefits can be well worth the added expense.


For instance, the abovementioned seal conditioners can be surprisingly effective. According to Zhang “usually after two oil changes the leaking will be gone.” Additionally, he said, “some of the older vehicles tend to produce a white-bluish smoke,” which is a symptom of burning oil.

For instance, if an engine’s valve-guide seals have gone bad, the conditioners found in high-mileage lubricants can help reduce seepage past these parts, but that’s not all. Valvoline’s MaxLife product has a lower volatility rating, which means it’s less likely to burn in the first place. Zhang said this is “a fairly apparent thing [owners] can see after an oil change,” that is, less off-color smoke coming out of the tailpipe. Can you say instant gratification?​
 

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But you don’t have to drive a hooptie to run this kind of lubricant. Zhang said “it’s really good for high-mileage engines… for when vehicle performance is deteriorating,” but it can be used in brand-new cars as well. Added anti-wear and detergent compounds are just as helpful in a factory-fresh vehicle as they are in one that’s got 75,000 miles on the clock. IS IT WORTH THE EXTRA COST?


Asked directly about whether high-mileage oil was worth the added expense Zhang said “absolutely; it’s for the benefit of the engine.” He also noted that regardless of when you switch it helps keep your car or truck’s powerplant “running in optimum condition longer.”


Maintaining an older vehicle and keeping it rollin’ down the road for years to come is money in the bank compared to a monthly car payment, even if you have to spend a couple extra bucks at each oil change.

3671



https://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/05/use-high-mileage-oil-car.html
 

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Top 10 Best Oil Drain Pans

Jan 07, 2020



Unless you own an electric vehicle, routine oil changes are part of keeping your car’s engine in good running condition. You don’t necessarily have to head to your dealership or local mechanic to get an oil change however, as most vehicles can have their oil changed within the comforts of your garage or driveway. Some of the tools you’ll need when doing your own oil change include a jack, jack stands, oil filter wrench, and an oil drain pan to catch all your old oil. This is, of course, in addition to a replacement oil filter and new oil for your engine.

In this article, we’ll focus on the top 10 best oil drain pans you can purchase on Amazon. Truth be told, most oil drain pans are very similar, although some have a more versatile design than others. When choosing the best oil drain pan for your needs, make sure you check the capacity of the drain pan. Larger engines require more oil, which means you’ll need a larger drain pan if you have a V8, as opposed to a four-cylinder engine.






1. Editor's Pick: Hopkins FloTool Super Duty Drain Container
hopkins flotool 16-quart super duty drain container
One of the most popular oil drain pans on Amazon comes from Hopkins. With a capacity of 16 quarts, the Hopkins FloTool features a leak-proof design with heavy duty caps and seals, ergonomic handles, and elongated basins to capture the oil. This made in the U.S.A. oil drain pan can be stored upright or flat without leaking and is developed for high capacity, which means you can do multiple oil changes before having to empty it out.
Product features:
  • 16-quart capacity
  • Leak-proof design
  • Heavy duty caps and seals
  • Ergonomic handles
  • Elongated basins
  • Can be stored upright or flat
  • Made in the U.S.A.












2. ATD Tools Black Drain Pan
atd tools black drain pan
If you want something more basic, ATD Tools offers an 18-quart oil drain pan measuring 6″ deep with a 15.25″ diameter. It features a large spout on one end for easy pouring when disposing your old oil, while molded handles make for convenient carrying. An anti-splash lip helps ensure all your fluids stay within the drain pan. This may seem like a fairly basic oil drain pan, but its design is loved by many of its owners—especially for the spout, which allows you to drain straight from the pan without a funnel.
Product features:
  • 18-quart capacity
  • 6″ deep with 15.25″ diameter
  • Large spout for easy pouring
  • Molded handles for carrying
  • Anti-splash lip


3. Lumax Black Drainmaster Pan
lumax black 15-quart drainmaster pan
The Lumax Drainmaster Pan features a 15-quart capacity and a heavy duty construction with an E-Z handle design and E-Z roll wheels. At the top of the drain pan is a large 8″ opening with screw cap that can accommodate dirty oil filters. A catch-all basket allows you to easily retrieve drain plugs and your filter, while an o-ring seal ensures your liquids stay inside the container. If you’re willing to pay a bit more and want the convenience of added wheels to your drain pan, this is the one to get.
Product features:
  • 15-quart capacity
  • E-Z roll wheels and handle design
  • 8″ large opening with screw cap
  • Can use dirty oil filters
  • Catch-all basket
  • O-ring seal


4. Capri Tools Portable Oil Drain Pan
capri tools portable oil drain pan
Capri Tools’ offering is similar to ATD Tools’ drain pan on our list, with a large 18-quart capacity and an anti-splash lip. This oil pan is constructed of tough polyethylene material for long lasting durability. Oil can be drained directly into the large opening while the molded handle and 1″ diameter spout makes carrying, pouring, and storing easy. Capri Tools has a lineup of different pans, including a green-colored pan and a smaller capacity drain pan.
Product features:
  • 18-quart capacity (also available with an 8-quart capacity)
  • Constructed of tough polyethylene material
  • Large opening
  • Molded handle and 1″ diameter diameter spout


5. ARKSEN Portable Waste Oil Drain Tank
arksen portable waste oil drain tank
Not everyone needs something like ARKSEN’s portable waste oil drain tank, but for those who need a more complex system for their vehicle, this is made for you. This is a commercial oil drain tank with 80-quart capacity along with a venturi-vacuum extracting system. To easily transfer the oil from the tank to your secondary container, you can simply use an air compressor.
This oil drain tank is height adjustable from 45″ to 72.5″. With a heavy duty and rugged steel construction, this oil drain tank may be expensive but it’ll last your car’s lifetime and more. For easy mobility, ARKSEN has equipped the tank with 2 fixed 6″ wheels and a pair of 3″ swivel casters.
Product features:
  • Commercial oil drain tank with 80-quart capacity
  • Venturi-vacuum extracting system
  • Height adjustable (45″ to 72.5″)
  • Heavy duty steel construction
  • Equipped with wheels and casters for easy mobility
  • Includes regulator and gauge












6. Custom Accessories Oil Drain Pan
custom accessories oil drain pan
Don’t care for any bells and whistles and just want a real cheap oil drain pan? Custom Accessories has the answer with this option, featuring a 6-quart capacity at a really affordable price. It doesn’t have any standout features and one glance at its photo tells the full story. Just keep in mind that the spout’s design isn’t the best, as some owners have noted pouring out of the pan can be awkward.
Product features:
  • Basic 6-quart capacity oil drain pan
  • Extremely affordable—you can buy 2 for less than the price of a fancier oil drain pan
  • Spout design isn’t the best


7. Matrix Concepts Oil Drain Container
matrix concepts oil drain container
Find black oil drain pans to be a bit boring? Matrix Concepts offers a clear oil drain pan, if that’s your thing. Designed to be easy to store, carry, and empty, this oil drain pan has a built-in container along with a screw-on cap and plug for a tight seal. An extra-large carrying handle makes for a comfortable and secure grip, while emptying the container is similar to pouring a glass of milk. With no built-in spout however, you’ll likely need a funnel to empty out the container without causing a mess.
One thing to note is that this container doesn’t have a large capacity, so it’s best for cars with smaller engine.
Product features:
  • Clear oil drain pan
  • Screw-on cap and plug for tight seal
  • Extra-large carrying handle
  • No built-in spout
  • Small capacity


8. Lisle Oil Lift Drain
lisle oil lift drain
If you’re somehow able to easily get your car up in the air and prefer an oil lift drain, take a look at Lisle’s option. Featuring a uniquely shaped, translucent jug that holds 32 quarts, this oil lift drain can be adjusted from 36.5″ to 74″. The bottom of the container features 4 ball bearing wheels measuring 2.5″ that swivel and roll easily. Other features include a heavy duty adjustment clamp, large handle, big pour spout with threaded cap, and a large 15″ funnel with a built-in strainer to catch drain plugs.
Product features:
  • Translucent jug with 32-quart capacity
  • Height adjustable (36.5″ to 74″)
  • Ball bearing wheels (4 x 2.5″)
  • Heavy duty adjustment clamp
  • Large handle
  • Big pour spout with threaded cap
  • Large 15″ funnel with built-in strainer







9. Motivx Tools Oil Drain Pan
motivx tools engine oil drain pan
This oil drain pan from Motivx Tools looks very similar to offerings from ATD Tools and Capri Tools. Made from heavy duty polyethylene with a reinforced bottom, this oil drain pan has a 16-quart capacity. Dual front handles and a large rear handle makes it easy to carry this pan around, while the anti-splash lip wraps around the entire inside edge of the pan to ensure liquids stay within the container. Like the other pans from ATD Tools and Capri Tools, Motivx Tools’ offering has a pour spout for easy emptying.
Product features:
  • 16-quart capacity
  • Heavy duty polyethylene construction with reinforced bottom
  • Handles for easy carrying
  • Spout for easy pouring
  • Anti-splash lip


10. Goplus Portable Oil Drain Pan with Pump
goplus portable oil drain pan with pump
This is one of the most expensive oil drain pans on our list, but it’s extremely versatile if you’re willing to pay the money. The Goplus portable oil drain pan has a massive 68-quart capacity and is equipped with 4 swivel casters measuring 4″ for easy maneuverability. The tank is made from high-impact polypropylene, making it lightweight and durable. Attached to the oil drain pan is a 29″ T-handle that folds for easy storage, along with an 8′ hose for added versatility with the pump for convenient draining.
Product features:
  • Massive 68-quart capacity
  • Swivel casters (4 x 4″)
  • Constructed of high-impact polypropylene
  • 29″ T-handle for easy maneuvering (foldable for easy storage)
  • 8′ hose
  • Pump for convenient draining






 

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I got a Dodge Nitro in February, and it was due for an oil change a few weeks ago. My dad went to change the oil and he couldn't get to the oil filter to change it. Does anyone have any ideas of how to get to it??
It helps to first jack the front end off the ground, if you don't it's a tight fit....almost got stuck without jacking it up but lifting the car up helps with clearance and you can get it from underneath ?
 

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Top 10 Best Oil Filter Wrenches



By Jason Siu Jan 21, 2020


Top 10 Best Oil Filter Wrenches



Want to start saving some money by changing your own oil? Most vehicles can have their oil changed from the comforts of your garage or driveway with a little bit time and labor. Some of the tools you’ll need to change your own oil include a floor jack, jack stands, oil drain pan, and an oil filter wrench. While it’s possible to take off most oil filters with your bare hands, spending a few bucks on an oil filter wrench will make your life a lot easier. Some oil filters feature a slick finish, and depending on where it’s located on your car, could be a pain to grip.

Several companies offer vehicle specific oil filter wrenches, which are sized to match the oil filter on a particular vehicle. If you need an oil filter wrench for a certain car, those are great options as well. But for this article, we’ll be taking a look at universal oil filter wrenches, which are adjustable to accommodate a variety of oil filter sizes.

You’ll notice there are several different designs for oil filter wrenches, and choosing the right one comes down to personal preference for many. Some mechanics prefer band-style wrenches, while others find it easier to remove oil filters with adjustable, 3-jaw wrenches. In this article, we’ll detail a variety of different wrenches, so choose the one that fits your needs. You can even get yourself a wrench with adjustable straps so you can use it around the house.

For more information on the top 10 best oil filter wrenches, refer to our table of contents.


Table of contents



1. Editor's Pick: TEKTON Oil Filter Pliers
tekton 12 oil filter pliers
TEKTON’s oil filter pliers are available in 12″ and 16″ sizes, with the 12″ wrench fitting oil filters up to 4.5″ in diameter and the 16″ wrench designed for oil filters up to 5.5″ in diameter. Both wrenches have a three-position slip joint design to make it easy to adjust to the size of the oil filter. They also feature large teeth that are set at a right angle to the jaw, so they’ll bite in either direction for a secure grip on the oil filter. The long handles on these wrenches feature soft, nonslip material for a comfortable grip.
TEKTON’s oil filter pliers are one of the most popular oil filter wrenches on Amazon, offering extra reach and leverage that other band-style wrenches can’t offer. And since they’re just pliers, they’re easy to use and doesn’t require a ratchet or any other tools.
Product features:
  • Available in 12″ (filters up to 4.5″ in diameter) or 16″ (filters up to 5.5″ in diameter)
  • Three-position slip joint design
  • Right-angle teeth grip
  • Soft, comfortable grips for nonslip control







2. Neiko Two-Way Adjustable Oil Filter Wrench
neiko two-way adjustable oil filter wrench
Boasting a patented 3-jaw design is this oil filter wrench from Neiko. Designed to be an easier way to remove oil filters, this two-way adjustable oil filter wrench will work on most vehicles, accommodating oil filters ranging in size from 2.5″ to 4″. This easy-to-use oil filter wrench works with any 3/8″ or 1/2″ drive ratchet or breaker bar, or any 13/16″ wrench. It also boasts a low-profile design, allowing you to deal with low clearance areas. Neiko does include a 3/8″ to 1/2″ conversion socket.
Product features:
  • Patented 3-jaw design
  • Works on oil filters ranging from 2.5″ to 4″ diameter
  • Compatible with 3/8″ or 1/2″ drive ratchet or breaker bar, or 13/16″ wrench
  • Low-profile design
  • Includes 3/8″ to 1/2″ conversion socket


3. Craftsman 2-Piece Rubber Strap Wrench Set
craftsman 2-piece 16 rubber strap wrench
No list of tools would be complete without a product from Craftsman. You can get a 2-piece wrench set for an affordable price, with the larger wrench dealing with oil filters up to 6.375″ in diameter and the smaller wrench handling up to 4″ in diameter. Craftsman’s oil filter wrenches use a strong, reinforced rubber strap for grip. To use these wrenches, simply strap them around the filter, tighten the strap until it grips securely, and turn.
Each wrench features cushioned plastic handles that make them comfortable to hold. And of course, they’re backed by Craftsman’s Lifetime Guarantee.
Product features:
  • Set of 2 wrenches (up to 6.375″ in diameter for larger, up to 4″ in diameter for smaller)
  • Strong, reinforced rubber strap
  • Cushioned plastic handles
  • Backed by Craftman’s Lifetime Guarantee







4. Innovant Adjustable 3-Jaw Oil Filter Wrench
innovant adjustable 3 jaw oil filter wrench tool
This adjustable 3-jaw oil filter wrench from Innovant is another popular option. It fits oil filters ranging from 2.125″ to 4.5″ and works with either 3/8″ or 1/2″ drive ratchets. Innovant Tools includes a 1/2″ to 3/8″ socket adapter and several pairs of black large nitrile rubber gloves, which is a nice bonus. Using 3 geared metal prongs, this oil filter wrench is very effective on tight filters. With its slim design, it’s easier to use in more confined spaces compared to strap- or chain-type wrenches.
This wrench is designed for smaller oil filters, so make sure it works with your particular car prior to purchasing it. The company does offer a 60-day money back guarantee.
Product features:
  • Adjustable 3-jaw design
  • Fits oil filters from 2.125″ diameter to 4.5″ diameter
  • Works with either 3/8″ or 1/2″ drive ratchets
  • Includes 1/2″ to 3/8″ socket adapter and black rubber gloves
  • Slim design
  • 60-day money back guarantee


5. Motivx Tools Adjustable Oil Filter Wrench
motivx tools adjustable oil filter wrench
Motivx Tools offers two different adjustable oil filter wrenches, one designed for filters sized 2.5″ to 3.25″, while the larger wrench works for filters with diameter 3.15″ to 4.15″. Both wrenches will remove traditional spin off-style oil filters and should not be used for installing a new filter. They also shouldn’t be used on chrome plated oil filters or cartridge-style filters where you have to remove a plastic or metal cap to expose the filter element.
Both wrenches feature a .050″ captured spring along with a tooth-style design for better grip and less slip. The top plate is constructed from 3/8″ thick solid steel, while the jaws are built from nickel-plated 4130 chromoly steel.
Although the product listings on Amazon state these oil filter wrenches have a 1-year warranty, Motivx Tools actually provides limited lifetime warranties on its oil filter wrenches according to the company’s website.
Product features:
  • Available in 2 sizes (2.5″ to 3.25″ and 3.15″ to 4.15″)
  • Designed for traditional spin off-style oil filters
  • Features a .050″ captured spring
  • Tooth-style design
  • 3/8″ solid steel top plate with nickel-plated 4130 chromoly steel jaws
  • Limited lifetime warranty












6. GEARWRENCH Heavy Duty Oil Filter Wrench
gearwrench heavy duty oil filter wrench
GEARWRENCH offers 2 different types of oil filter wrenches, a band-type wrench and a strap-type wrench. The band-type wrench fits 3.75″ to 4.5″ filters and features a wider band for better grip. Designed for high torque requirements, this wrench uses a strong anchor plate to help remove excessively tight filters from your car.
If you prefer a strap wrench, GEARWRENCH’s offering handles filters up to 9″ in diameter, making it a good option for trucks and tractors. It’s made of high strength oil resistant nylon with a forged steel handle that has been chrome plated. It accommodates 1/2″ and 3/8″ drives.
Product features:
  • Choose from band-type (3.75″ to 4.5″ filters) or strap-type wrench (up to 9″ filters)
  • Designed for high torque requirements
  • Band-type wrench features strong anchor plate
  • Strap-type wrench constructed of oil resistant nylon
  • Chrome plated, forged steel handle accommodates 1/2″ and 3/8″ drives

7. Channellock 9" Oil Filter & PVC Pliers
channellock 9 oil filter and pvc pliers
The Channellock brand is another popular company with mechanics and it offers 9″ long oil filter pliers. Designed to work on most common size car and small engine filters, these pliers have a jaw capacity of 1.75″ to 3.5″. They combine the strength and reliability of Channellock’s iconic Tongue and Groove Plier with the special needs of large PVC and oil filters. The right angle, laser heat-treated teeth provide better grip and durability, while the Permalock fastener eliminates nut and bolt failure.
These pliers use high carbon C1080 steel along with an electronic coating for ultimate rust prevention. They also sport Chanellock’s iconic blue handle, which is comfortable to hold and easy to spot among the rest of your tools.
Product features:
  • 9″ length
  • Jaw capacity of 1.75″ to 3.5″
  • Right angle, laser-heat treated teeth
  • Permalock fastener eliminates nut and bolt failure
  • High carbon C1080 steel with electronic coating
  • Iconic Channellock blue handle
  • Made in USA
S





8. TuffMan Tools Oil Filter Wrench Set
tuffman tools oil filter wrench set
If you prefer rubber strap wrenches, TuffMan Tools offers a 2-pack at an affordable price. The larger wrench is adjustable up to 6″ diameter, while the smaller wrench can be adjusted up to 4″ diameter. Each wrench uses adjustable and flexible rubber straps to grip the oil filter and a tight, non-slip grip makes the wrench comfortable to hold. Since these are adjustable strap wrenches, you can even use them on a variety of items around the house, like opening a jar. They can fit on any plastic or PVC fitting and fixtures, which comes in handy since there are two different sized wrenches with each purchase.
Product features:
  • Adjustable rubber strap wrenches
  • Includes large wrench (up to 6″ diameter) and small wrench (up to 4″ diameter)
  • Non-slip grip handle
  • Can be used on a variety of items

9. Lisle Oil Filter Swivel Wrench
lisle oil filter swivel wrench
This band-style wrench is a more traditional oil filter wrench. From Lisle, it features a stainless steel band with a permanently bonded textured coating on the handle for gripping power. It works on filters sized 3.5″ to 3.875″, which means it’ll fit most popular 3.625″ sized filters. A swivel handle on this oil filter wrench makes it easy to turn in tight spaces—the handle swivels more than 180 degrees and has adjustable tension.
Product features:
  • Stainless steel band-style wrench
  • Permanently bonded textured coating on handle
  • Fits on filters sized 3.5″ to 3.875″
  • Handle swivels more than 180 degrees
  • Adjustable tension







10. OEMTOOLS Adjustable Magnetic Oil Filter Wrench
oemtools adjustable magnetic oil filter wrench
Our last recommended oil filter wrench comes from OEMTOOLS. Sporting a flashy green finish, this is an adjustable magnetic oil filter wrench with a 3-jaw design. It fits oil filters from 2.4″ to 3.6″ and includes a 3/8″ to 1/2″ drive adapter. Spring-loaded legs provide a secure grip on the filter, along with its magnetic base attachment. It’s an extremely affordable and versatile option, so long as your filter size is under 3.6″.
Product features:
  • Adjustable wrench with 3-jaw design
  • Fits 2.4″ to 3.6″ oil filters
  • Spring-loaded legs
  • Magnetic base attachment
  • Includes 3/8″ to 1/2″ drive adapter
 

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Among them I like Channellock 209 9-Inch oil Filter and PVC Pliers and TEKTON 5866 12-Inch Oil Filter Pilers the most.
Channellock 209 9-Inch is a totally different oil filter removal tool from other conventional wrenches both figuratively and literally. It is designed to accommodate oil filters of almost all cars, trucks, and heavy equipment.
TEKTON 5866 12-Inch Oil Filter Pilers is similar to the Channellock – it is also an oil filter plier – but with an improved design –12 inches long. It has a very strong grip that makes you feel in control when removing your oil filter. It also has the 16 inches version for vehicles with larger oil filters.
 
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